King Buggy Cockpit

Over the weekend, I concentrated on making some headway with the cockpit for the Mechanica King Buggy aircraft, which will need a better name…
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With no real plan, I just added bits of plastic until I looked finished. Using Lego as the cockpit base was definitely the way to go, nice right angles and ready made blocks. I’m sure the kids won’t mind that I have now pinched all their Lego.
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The whole thing slots into the fuselage nicely and the control panel will be visible enough to be noticed, but hopefully not so much that the uneven detail will stand out.
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For the moment, I am just using a pin as the yoke until I can think of something else or just go with the pin.

Karman King Buggy Converison

I wanted to make some aircraft models for my steampunk Mechanica force and I had thought ages ago that the old Rackham King Buggy would be a great place to start. I still wanted to keep my AT-43 Karman army intact, so I bought some ridiculously cheap King Buggy’s from Miniature Market. When I say cheap, I think they were US$10 each and that was before Sterling bombed against the dollar.

I removed the rear gunner and chin mounted machine guns. I wanted to have the pilot cockpit where the rear gunner was located. My first thought was to build an enclosed cockpit and not necessarily have a visible pilot model. As these aircraft were to be used for my Mechanica force, I realised that some of the Dystopian Legions Automotan models are in a kneeling pose and these easily could be modelled in a sitting position. So I would have a go at making an open cockpit with a visible pilot.

I removed the front grill and was going to nose mount one of the King Buggy machine guns but found a Ramshackle rottary machine gun was much more intimidating looking.karman-king-buggy-conversion1
I managed to carefully crack open the fuselage, lucky really that they do not use much glue when sticking them together. If I had made this myself from a kit, it would never get opened up again without doing some serious damage.

One of the kneeling Automotans was put together in a sitting pose. Once again, these infantry models are really hard to stick together.
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I started by making up a simple pilot seat which I was then going to embellish with various bits of detail.
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I was using some Lego bricks to build up the height of the cockpit floor and then decided just to use Lego to make the whole pilot seat. Much easier.
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When positioned inside the fuselage it is about the height I was looking for.
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I added a front panel to the cockpit so some controls can be fitted, this also covered up some unsightly internal bits .
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Using some Game$ Work$hop control panels from a Rhino I think, I made some Silly Gum moulds and green stuffed some extras.
karman-king-buggy-conversion7I will have to look for some other bits that can be stuck in the cockpit, I need some levers and some more controls of some sort.

Dust SSU Mech

ssu-mech2I am a big fan of Dust Battlefield/Tactics/Warfare and have quite a few Allied and Axis models. I do not intend to start an SSU force, but I do like some of the models. I acquired one of the Mechs some time ago and was wondering what to do with it. Maybe use it in Steam Wars or maybe in a sci-fi game…

The model was in a running pose that really was leaning too far forward, so the first thing I did was carefully twist the legs off keeping the lugs!
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When I had straightened the model up, I thought the cannon and flamer arms seemed a bit long so I shortened them by removing most of the articulated arm.
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But it makes sense for the chainsword arm to be a longer limb so it can be swung around in combat. As the arms do not need to be glued in place I can switch the chainsword and flamer arms.

I just need to decide what I will use if for.

First Go At Rogue Stars

roguestarsMr Steinbergs shed saw our first go at Rogue Stars last night. After a long build up with plenty of online hype and expectation, the rule book was released just before Christmas and I was delighted to get my hands on it. This was soon tempered by the first blog reviews that I saw as they were not particularly favourable. Several gamers were complaining about the number of counters in play and the large number of modifier tables. Undeterred, we selected a small group of models and played out a simple kill everything scenario to try out the rules. We were both quite cautious with our initial stab at creating model profiles, we steered away from any Psykers and kept the weapon and skill selection quite basic.

Sedition2Although there are a lot of tables and there a lot of counters, I like the fact that each model in the small faction is a unique character model and can be equipped in any way. As we created a character sheet for each of our models, we kept all of the counters off the battlefield and on the character sheets. Each model can build up a lot of Pin, Stress and Wound counters so keeping them away from the models on the table is definitely the best way to go.

inquisitor5Once we had been through the ranged combat and melee combat mechanics a couple of times, it got quicker and quicker and as with any new game system, the rules begin to become easier to recall and implement. There are still some rules we were probably not enforcing every time, but another read of the rules now we have the first game under our belts should clear up a few things.

randommishima1Luckily, I like playing with spreadsheets, so I am going to work on a concise character sheet that should fit two to an A4 page and show most of the specific model attributes and have space for all the status counters. We are planning round two next week. I wonder what fun models I can find in the Loft Full Of Lead?